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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
of course its friend, china is on the security council and has blocked those kind of actions in the past, jenna. jenna: interesting that you mentioned china. is there any indication that the north koreans had help from the outside? any sort of outside country with this launch? >> reporter: well there is no evidence per se but it is widely known that the north koreans could not get the parts for their ballistic missile program without having those parts flown through china, bypassed through china. there also have been reports on the voice of america that an iranian team of scientists have been seen recently, in recent days in north korea. so there is questions about the relationship between, and any help that may have been provided to the north koreans by the iranians. clearly the north koreans are very proud of this long range ballistic missile launch. the one in april failed miserably. and for the first time then they admitted that it did fail publicly. this time they extended the window and did not invite foreign journalists to watch this and simply announced when it was successful. th
for its missile program in china. we know they buy things for their gas centrifuge program in china. some things are made in germany. probably made in the u.s. china has been a major gap in this whole system. on sanctions and north korea could face tougher action from china might constrict some of its ability to buy things that it absolutely needs for its nuclear programs. jon: you think it is likely american-made technology is helping north korea with its missile program? >> could be. i don't know the missile program nearly as well as the nuclear but what north korea does, it uses china a sense as a transshipment point because many companies, high-tech companies from america, from europe, have subsidiaries in china, selling to chinese industries and trading companies. north korea works that system very well to end up with those kinds of high-tech items from outside china. and so while i can't speak specifically on the missile program i certainly can on the nuclear and yes, indeed, north korea buys european high-tech equipment and likely u.s. equipment. so it's a problem. china has been m
china. >> i think you saw the chinese make clore their opposition to this launch, prior to it and the regret over the fact it took place after it happened. >> we are very much ready to engage with our colleagues on the council. we will be searching for a clear and credible response. >> kim jung un is expected to capitalize on the boost of the internal standing that the launch provided to move to conduct another nuclear test. five years ago, then senator obama vowed for diplomacy with dictators like kim. >> would you be willing to meet with the leaders of iran, syria, venezuela, cuba, north korea? to bring the gap the divides our countries. >> i would. the reason is this. the notion that somehow not talking to countries is punishment to them, which has been the guiding diplomatic principle of this administration is ridiculous. >> yet, it was under the bush administration that the six party talks were launched and achieved the notable success. north korea demolition in 2008 of a water cooling tower used in the nuclear programs. with the obama administration ruling out dire
.n. security resolutions. he also talked about china's decision to the aircraft carrier in the obama administration shifted À la terry resources for the pacific region. this is a half-hour. >> well, good morning and allow hot. i am glad to be here to talk to you about the pacific command, where we are today to where we see ourselves heading in the future. since the last time i was here, we continue to move forward on the rebalanced initiative after as directed by president obama. the rebalanced rows on the strengths of the entire u.s. government, including policy, diplomacy, trade and of course security and that the area i work in. for me, the rebalanced has been and continues to be the strength of the relationships, adjusting our military posture and presents and employ new capacities to ensure we continue to effectively and efficiently contribute to the stability of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interests. of course the keys to success of the innovative access agreement, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases come efficient force posture in yeste
.n. security council. it's likely china will try to water down those provisions but it's also certain that the provisions will pass. >> you don't think china will try to veto it? >> i don't think they will veto it. they don't want north korea doing this. >> china is the only ally that they really have. i wonder, do you think it's possible they didn't inform china in advance of the timing of this launch? >> it's possible they did not. people now suspect that the information that we had that north korea was moving its rocket, something was wrong with it, was it an intentional deceptive move? they thought there would be attempts to shoot it down. they wanted to fool japan. they succeeded. >> and it certainly does strengthen the new young leader kim jong-un domestically. >> absolutely. they have been trying since 1998 to launch a long-range missile and they failed in the previous four attempts. they succeeded in this. it's not a rocket that can deliver a major warhead. there are marriajor hurdles to >> they have done in north korea where a lot of people are starving what south korea has b
? the chinese and russians don't help us on sanctions. they have been ineffective because china that dan. you know, when you look at it, everything that we have tried after the bush years has been a failure. now, during the bush years in the early part of that administration, it puts real financial squeeze on the regime. but then they drop it because they have this fantasy that if we can just sit down one more time with the north koreans, suddenly we will have a deal that will make all this go away. it is not how the world works. the north koreans are getting better each time out launching missiles and setting off nuclear explosions. >> on that note, how realistic do you think it is? and how soon do you think it would be that they would be able to i'm one of these long-range missiles with a nuclear warhead? >> that is the real question. this last missile test was real important because it showed that they were successful. they got it up into the atmosphere. it can go a long way to the united states. now, if they perfect nuclear explosions and start miniaturizing it, being able to put it on a
, engineering, and math. if you dig in, the numbers are stunning. you look at the fact that i think china is now roughly 44% of their graduates are in those fields. europe is at 24%. america is at 16% of our graduates. i say this respectfully, knowing we are on c-span, but when the europeans are outdistancing us by 50% in an area as important talent inng human challeng these key fields that will drive innovation, you know we are in trouble. i will correct one comment, the democratic side and marco rubio and jerry moran, we have put forward legislation long before the election that says let's look at this, the competition issue and put forward an approach that many of us, including those of us in the business world, have been talking about for decades. let's recognize that while we know that we do need to prime the pump with science, engineering, math graduates, native-born americans, partly in the numbers with middle school with girls and children of color and the enormous challenges short and long term, we also have to still continue to attract talent from the world. one of the ways that we can
kim three seems to can consolidate his power. we are waiting to see if this affects china and their soup harris: you mentioned the evidence that south korea has found that the north will be able to fire at us, at our mainland, possibly come in the next two years. is there anything the south is doing at this point? people are feeling imminent danger. >> the south issued that warning about the capability about the missile tests. there is concern about the region, but it is very difficult to stop anything like that. we have some kind of missile patriots in different types of missiles to try to stop that. but it is very difficult if you have a three stage rocket to be able to bring that down very easily. but we did see before that last test that south korea and japanese and american forces were put on alert. perhaps bring you down and casey came came into their territory. back to you. harris: david pifer reporting live today from bangkok. jon: the fiscal cliff is a sport is a way. looking beyond the deadline, short-term battle will have a long-term political impact. let's talk
it -- and partners such as singapore and the philippines and expanding our dialogue and -- in exchanges with china. we are also an handed our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes -- expanding our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes allocating our naval fleet to have a 60/40 s plit between the pacific and atlantic oceans, increasing army and marine presence in the region. locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific, including new deployments of f- 22's and the mv22's to japan. and lay the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter. the third element of our strategy is that as we do force projection in the asia-pacific and middle east, we still have to maintain our global leadership and presence by building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe and using these innovative rotational deployment as a way to do exercises and training with other countries, developing their capabilities so they can provide for their own security. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)